Entries by AusPBC

Should we change the definition of “pro bono legal services”?

Should “low-bono” work count as “pro bono”? Should “pro bono” include work done for clients operating for profit?
These important questions and others around the definition of “pro bono legal services” are open for public discussion in National Pro Bono Aspirational Target: The Target at Ten Years, a paper released by the Centre to mark a decade of the Target.

Asia Pro Bono Conference continues to emphasise education and empowerment

The focus of this conference continues to be on education and empowerment with a significant number of students attending particularly from the University of Malaya, but also students from Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane and the University of Newcastle. Staff and students from the law faculties of the Universities from the region and NGOs made up about 20-25 per cent of the audience. This, together with the many lawyers from less developed countries in the region and its participatory style gives this conference a unique informality and dynamism.

Moree/Walgett Housing Repairs Project wins 2017 Pro Bono Partnership Award

Located in North-Eastern NSW, Moree and Walgett are small outback towns with a rich Indigenous and colonial history. Regrettably, Indigenous disadvantage persists in the region to this day, particularly in relation to housing conditions. On a single street in Moree, issues ranged from black mould in a leaking bathroom or a shower with no floor, to exposed and dangerous electrical fittings, and an elderly woman living without a functioning stove.

PILnet Global Forum inspires in Budapest

It was fitting that the 2017 Global Pro Bono Forum (16-19 October 2017) was held in the place where PILnet established its first European clearing house in 2006. Celebrating 20 years since its inception, PILnet staged a forum that brought together many committed and talented public interest lawyers and pro bono enthusiasts to deliver an informative, thought-provoking and inspiring event. Notable was the depth of knowledge and experience of presenters.

The conference was held against the backdrop of pressing issues in Hungary concerning defence of the public interest and respect for the rule of law.

Q&A with Peter Seidel, Arnold Bloch Leibler

Congratulations to the pro bono team at Arnold Bloch Leibler on winning the 2017 Lawyers Weekly Pro Bono Program of the Year Award. We asked ABL public interest law partner Peter Seidel to tell us about the firm’s pro bono program. This article kicks off a new series of Q&A pieces focusing on some of the outstanding pro bono programs run by National Pro Bono Aspirational Target signatories, as part of the Target’s ten-year anniversary celebrations. ABL are a Foundation Signatory to the Target.

Q&A with Lauren Miller, Carnival Australia

“Our pro bono work is a natural extension of our organisation’s commitment to sustainability, diversity and inclusion. The idea that shared value is created through contribution to our communities is fundamental to how we operate. In some ways, our pro bono work is simply another expression of that principle. The shared value for our organisation and for the organisations we support through pro bono work is mutually reinforcing.”

Conversations With Corporates: Why pro bono?

In-house lawyers are a significant part of the legal landscape. Our conversations with corporate counsel have revealed some common themes. When it comes to pro bono, in-house corporate lawyers and their employers can both meaningfully contribute to, and greatly benefit from, doing pro bono. Gabriela Christian-Hare, our Head of Strategy & Policy, shares some of these insights in this article.

Volunteers and Pro Bono Partnerships make significant contribution to Community Legal Centres

The recent survey by the National Association of Community Legal Centres reveals that pro bono partnerships contributed 57,848 hours of assistance to Community Legal Centres in 2015/16, with volunteers supplying an additional 17,098 hours of work per week. Individual volunteers supplied an additional 17,098 hours of work per week or an estimated 889,096 hours to 112 CLCs in the year 2015/16.